Tag Archives: European Court of Justice

Will Europe’s Politicians Let The Courts Make Fiscal Policy?

One overlooked aspect of the agreement struck by the member nations of the European Union over fiscal and budgetary alignment is the matter of enforcement. The failure to incorporate the proposed agreement into the EU’s basic treaty, the Lisbon Treaty, means that neither the European Commission nor the European Court of Justice will have standing to deal with recalcitrants. Both institutions’ writ runs only to treaty matters, not those covered by intra-EU sub-agreements and those between national governments, as this latest deal will be structured in the face of opposition by non-euro-using countries, notably the UK.

That is one reason that the agreement envisions the new fiscal and budgetary constraints being baked into national constitutions, and the European Court of Justice being given new powers to adjudicate on whether countries are baking in the Brussels-approved manner. This is a conscious attempt to put the governance of national fiscal policy under greater judicial and less political sway, just as the EU has used the courts to enforce central directives in other areas.

One of the failures of the Maastricht agreement that launched the euro 10 years ago was that countries’ compliance with the economic conditions for membership – holding budget deficits to no more than 3% of GDP was one of them, remember – was entirely in the hands of national politicians. For all the goodwill being expressed towards greater fiscal integration in the heat of the euro debt crisis, national politicians are not going to give up their power of economic policy making willingly. Many will see this as the judicial Trojan Horse that will lead to a Federal EU with full economic and political integration. National politics is going to continue to shape Europe’s fiscal integration, and markets will have to learn to live with all the uncertainty that implies.

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Filed under Fiscal Policy, Macroeconomy